Archive for the ‘Isaiah 44’ Tag

Devotion for December 24 (LCMS Daily Lectionary)   2 comments

Above:  A Desert Scene in the U.S. Southwest

Image Source = Western History/Genealogy Department, Denver Public Library

via the Library of Congress

The Church, Dependent Upon God

DECEMBER 24, 2019

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Blessed Lord, who caused all holy scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 236

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The Assigned Readings:

Isaiah 44:21-45:13, 20, 25

Psalm 19 (Morning)

Psalms 132 and 114 (Evening)

Revelation 12:1-17

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The theology of Satan in Revelation differs from that we read in Job, where he works for God and does nothing without divine permission.  But we are not reading Job; we are reading Revelation.  The woman in Revelation 12 is the Church, the baby snatched away to safety is Jesus, and the thwarted dragon is Satan.  The baby might be safe, but the woman still has to face persecution and live in the wilderness for a time–but not forever.  The church will see its vindication.

The exiles of Judah must have felt isolated, as in the wilderness.  Yet, as we have read previously in Isaiah, God was plotting their liberation.  The chosen instrument was none other than Cyrus II, the Zoroastrian King of the Persians and the Medes.

The wilderness makes for a powerful metaphor.  We speak of “wilderness years” of powerful politicians before their height of power and influence.  Isolation in the wilderness (literal or metaphorical) can be difficult, of course.  Yet, as the Desert Fathers and Mothers of Egypt and Palestine learned, there, in the wilderness, they could not evade the fact of their total dependence on God.  The church, likewise, depends completely on God.  It is never far from extinction, yet it persists.  The gates of Hell will not triumph over it, by the grace and power of God.  As we rejoice this Christmas Eve, may we recall whose we are and who will vindicate us.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 4, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE ELEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF FELIX MANZ, FIRST ANABAPTIST MARTYR

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH SETON, FOUNDER OF THE AMERICAN SISTERS OF CHARITY

THE FEAST OF SAINTS GREGORY OF LANGRES, TERTICUS OF LANGRES, GALLUS OF CLERMONT, GREGORY OF TOURS, AVITUS I OF CLERMONT, MAGNERICUS OF TRIER, AND GAUGERICUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF JOHANN KONRAD WILHELM LOEHE, LUTHERAN PASTOR

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http://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2012/08/09/the-church-dependent-upon-god/

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Devotion for December 23 (LCMS Daily Lectionary)   4 comments

Above:  A Map of the Roman Empire in 117 C.E.

Nothing is Impossible with God

DECEMBER 23, 2019

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Blessed Lord, who caused all holy scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 236

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The Assigned Readings:

Isaiah 43:25-44:20

Psalm 24 (Morning)

Psalms 25 and 110 (Evening)

Revelation 11:1-19

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Appearances, we read in Isaiah 43:25-44:20 and Revelation 11:1-19, can deceive us.  We might seem to be be hopeless due to our sins and our circumstances, but God will redeem and vindicate us.  Polytheism was the default setting in most ancient Middle and Near Eastern religions, but there has always been just one deity.  And the church might seem to be defeated under the weight of the imperium, but it is not.

Nothing is impossible with God.

Once, at Piedmont College, in Demorest, Georgia, I heard a presentation by a professor visiting from the Twin Cities.  This gentleman specialized in critical thinking.  I recall most of all one statement he made:  Our most basic assumptions are those we do not recognize as being assumptions.  In other words, sometimes (if not much or most of the time) we do not distinguish correctly between the subjective and the objective categories, even though we can do so.  In this context we can overlook easily the workings and even the existence of God, whom our categories and preconceptions cannot contain.

An empire which has stood (mostly officially as a republic) for centuries will cease to exist.  A young, small, and persecuted religion will become the largest belief system on the planet.  An exile will end.  A young woman will give birth to a baby boy, who will grow up and redeem the human race of its sin.  What else will happen?

Nothing is impossible with God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 3, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF EDWARD CASWALL, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD PERRONET, BRITISH METHODIST PREACHER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GENEVIEVE, PROPHET

THE FEAST OF GLADYS AYLWARD, ANGLICAN MISSIONARY TO CHINA

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http://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2012/08/09/nothing-is-impossible-with-god-2/

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